Cape Coral

Cape Coral is a municipality located in Lee County, Florida, United States, on the Gulf of Mexico. Founded in 1957 and developed as a master-planned, pre-platted community, the city grew to a population of 154,305 by the year 2010.[citation needed] With an area of 120 square miles (310 km2), Cape Coral is the largest city between Tampa and Miami. It is a principal city in the Cape Coral – Fort Myers, Florida Metropolitan Statistical Area. The population estimate for the statistical area was 645,899 for 2009.[3] The city is known as a "Waterfront Wonderland", since with over 400 mi (640 km) of navigable waterways, Cape Coral has more miles of canals than any other city in the world.

Geography                    

Basisdaten

US-Bundesstaat:

Florida

County:

Lee County

Area:

298,1 km²

Population :

154000 (Stand: 2010)

Density:

1,479/sq mi (571/km2)

Elevation:

1,5 m ü. NN

ZIP codes:

33904, 33909, 33914
33990, 33991, 33993

Area code:

001 239

Geografische Lage:

26° 38′ N, 81° 59′ W Koordinaten: 26° 38′ N, 81° 59′ W

city government

City of Cape Coral
P.O. Box 150027
Cape Coral, Florida 33915

Website:

www.capecoral.net/

Cape Coral is located at 26°38′23″N 81°58′57″W. According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 120 square miles (310.8 km2). 110.09 square miles (285.1 km2) of it is land and 9.91 square miles (25.7 km2) of it (9%) is water.[1] Cape Coral is a large peninsula and is bordered in the south and east by the Caloosahatchee River and in the west by Matlacha Pass. The city of Fort Myers lies across the Caloosahatchee River to the south, and Matlacha and Pine Island lie across Matlacha Pass to the west. Matlacha Pass is home to Matlacha Pass National Wildlife Refuge and the state's Matlacha Pass Aquatic Preserve.[10] Cape Coral Florida has over 400 miles (640 km) of canals, more than any other city in the world.[11] Most of the canals are navigable and some have access to the Gulf of Mexico. Cape Coral's canal system is so extensive that local ecology and tides have been affected.

History

Cape Coral was founded in 1957. Real estate developers Leonard and Jack Rosen purchased a 103-square-mile (270 km2) tract known as Redfish Point for $678,000 in that year and, in 1958, began development of the city as a master-planned, pre-planned community. The Gulf American Corporation (GAC) was formed to develop the area. Canals were dug, streets paved, houses and businesses built.[citation needed] Cape Coral was promoted like no other Florida development. Celebrities were brought in to tout the benefits of "the Cape", as it is known locally. The first building was the Rosens' company headquarters, at the corner of Coronado and Cape Coral Parkway. Cape Coral's first permanent resident was Kenny Schwartz, the Rosens' general manager. Cape Coral's first four homes were completed in May 1958, on Riverside and Flamingo Drives.[6] Gulf American operated a fleet of five Cessna 172 aircraft to show prospective buyers, the development flying 108,000 passengers in a single year.[7] Development continued through the early 1960s, mostly on Redfish Point, south of Cape Coral Parkway. By 1963, the population was 2,850; 1,300 buildings had been finished or were under construction; 80 mi (130 km) of road had been built, and 160 mi (260 km) of canals had been dug.[citation needed] The public yacht club, a golf course, medical clinic and shopping center were up and running. A major addition for Cape Coral was the construction of the 3,400 feet (1,000 m) long Cape Coral Bridge across the Caloosahatchee River, which opened in early 1964. Before the bridge, a trip to Fort Myers was more than 20 mi (32 km) via Del Prado Boulevard and over the Edison Bridge to cross the river. The city incorporated in August 1970, and its population continued to grow rapidly until the real estate slowdown that gripped the region beginning in 2008.[8] In its early years, Cape Coral was known as a community with many retired residents.[citation needed] This changed with a population and construction boom in the 1990s, which brought in younger families and professionals. Twenty percent of the population is seasonal residents. Nowadays, the city has a wide variety of businesses, retail shops and restaurants on its major arteries: Cape Coral Parkway, Del Prado Boulevard, Santa Barbara Boulevard and Pine Island Road.

Infrastructure

Interstate 75 passes within 10 miles (16 km) of Cape Coral and connects northward to Tampa and on to the Midwestern states; and southeastward to Miami/Fort Lauderdale. Cape Coral borders on U.S. Highway 41. U.S. 41 and I-75 can be accessed from State Route 78 (Pine Island Road). Within the city a network of arterial roadways are established. Cape Coral has approximately 1,100 miles (1,800 km) of roadways. In general, the north/south routes are evenly spaced apart every one or two miles (3 km) and most of them have at least four lanes.

Bridges

Cape Coral is connected to Fort Myers by three bridges. The 3,400 feet (1,000 m) long Cape Coral Bridge connects Cape Coral Parkway to College Parkway in Fort Myers. The Midpoint Memorial Bridge connects Veterans Parkway to Colonial Boulevard. A number of other bridges span the Caloosahatchee River just east of Cape Coral.

Public transportation

Public transit services in Cape Coral are provided by LeeTran. LeeTran operates 18 fixed-route bus services, including 6 within Cape Coral.[20] Buses operate Monday through Saturday between 5:00 am and 9:45 pm, depending on the route.

Airports

Cape Coral is 14 miles (23 km) from Southwest Florida International Airport (RSW), which serves nearly eight million passengers annually. The airport’s new Midfield Terminal Complex opened in 2005, with three concourses and 28 gates. In 2010, eighteen national and two international airlines, as well as the two major cargo companies, served the airport. In addition to Southwest Florida International Airport, Cape Coral is also served by Page Field, a general aviation airport in Fort Myers eight miles (13 km) from Cape Coral. Charlotte County Airport (PGD) is located in Punta Gorda, just 10 miles (16 km) north of Cape Coral.

Hospitals

Acute care and trauma is provided by Cape Coral Hospital.[21] A 225,000-square-foot (20,900 m2) VA hospital is currently under construction in Cape Coral and will be completed by the end of 2011.

Utilities

The City of Cape Coral operates water and sewer systems for the city. Plans are in place to continue increasing the service area for water, irrigation water and sewer services. The city uses Reverse Osmosis plants to produce drinking water from brackish groundwater by removing the salt and impurities. Sewage is collected and highly treated to produce reclaimed water, locally known as "rescued water". Reclaimed water is distributed throughout the City through a dual water pipe system, and used for irrigation. Alternatively, reclaimed water can be discharged into the Caloosahatchee River. Electric power service in Cape Coral is provided by LCEC, a not-for-profit electric distribution cooperative. TECO Energy provides natural gas pipeline service to a limited portion of Cape Coral. CenturyLink and Comcast Cable provide the communications infrastructure in Cape Coral. Telecom companies have installed fiber optics throughout the Cape. By one analysis, Cape Coral has broadband capacity several times greater than that of larger Florida cities. Survivable, underground fiber interconnectivity is in place at the city center. The Cape was among the first in Florida to deploy the new 4.9 GHz pre-WiMax wireless channel authorized by the FCC in 2003 for exclusive Public Safety use

Climate

The area averages 355 days of sunshine each year, but experiences precipitation on 145 days per year. While the summers are very warm, humid and rainy, the winters in Cape Coral are dry with moderate temperatures. Cape Coral receives about 54 inches of rain each year, the majority of which falls from May to September. During the summer months, afternoon rains are heavy yet brief. The city is affected by the annual hurricane season, which begins officially on June 1 and continues through November

Parks  culture and recreation

The city features a sandy beach and fishing pier on the Caloosahatchee River at the public Yacht Basin & Club. Cape Coral is home to the expansive SunSplash Water Park (Virtual Tour of the Waterpark), more than 30 recreational parks, and seven golf courses. Cape Coral offers a variety of Gulf beaches in its immediate neighborhood, such as Sanibel Island and Fort Myers Beach. The area is known by birding enthusiasts for a wide variety of wildlife and the largest population of burrowing owls in the state of Florida.[27] Cape Coral’s 400-mile (640 km) canal system provides many residents with waterfront living with access to the Gulf of Mexico via the broad Caloosahatchee River and Matlacha Pass. The Parks and Recreation Department maintains three public boat launching facilities. The Gulf of Mexico provides access to smaller tropical islands, rookeries, and sports fishing grounds. Cape Coral’s cultural assets include the Historical Museum, the Art Studio, the Cape Coral Art League, and the Cultural Park Theater, a 187-seat performing arts facility that serves as home to community actors. In addition, there are several regional arts and performance venues in the immediate area, including the Barbara B. Mann Performing Arts Hall. Several parks and ecological preserves allow observation of the local wildlife. Elevated nature trails wind through the mangroves at Four Mile Cove Ecological Preserve. Mike Greenwell founded an amusement park called "Mike Greenwell's Bat-A-Ball & Family Fun Park" that opened in February 1992.

The beaches of Captiva, Sanibel and Ft. Myers are about 20 - 30 minutes' drive of Cape Coral.
With its snow-white sand beaches gently sloping into the sea and lush vegetation they are recognized as the most beautiful beaches in all America.


The most beautiful golf courses of Florida can be found in Cape Coral and Ft. Myers.

Sport boats can be rented at any size desired. There is the right boat for every occasion: no matter if you prefer cruising comfortably on the miles of canals in Cape Coral or on a yacht at sea while fishing or leisurely enjoying the scenery. 

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